Last edited by Kajitilar
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

5 edition of A Commentary on the First Book of Samuel found in the catalog.

A Commentary on the First Book of Samuel

  • 260 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by BiblioLife in Charleston, SC .
Written in English


About the Edition

2009 publication date from Amazon record
Reprint. Originally published: New York : Macmillan Co., 1919.

Edition Notes

Statementby Loring W. Batten
SeriesBiblioLife reproduction series ; The Bible for Home and School
The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Paginationv, 236 p.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25421042M
ISBN 101110107943
ISBN 109781110107940

1 Samuel 1 New International Version (NIV) The Birth of Samuel. 1 There was a certain man from Ramathaim, a Zuphite [] from the hill country of Ephraim, whose name was Elkanah son of Jeroham, the son of Elihu, the son of Tohu, the son of Zuph, an Ephraimite. 2 He had two wives; one was called Hannah and the other Peninnah. Peninnah had children, but Hannah had none.   This is Frank Marshall’s Commentary on 1 Samuel – part of a series written for Schools and Colleges. My thanks to Book Aid for making a copy of this public domain title available for digitisation.. Frank Marshall [], The First Book of Samuel, 17th edn., London: George Gill & Sons, Ltd.,

Book Descriptions: Professor Ackroyd's introduction summarizes the place of the First Book of Samuel in the Old Testament canon, its relationship with history and its theological purpose. The main divisions of the text are those provided by the New English Bible itself, but the text is further subdivided for the purposes of the commentary, which draws out the kind of significance . This view is evidently based on 1 Chronicles , "Now the acts of King David first and last are written in the book of Samuel the seer, and in the book of Nathan the prophet, and in the book of Gad the seer." But the wording of the text indicates that there is question of three distinct works.

The First Book of Samuel The events recorded in 1 Samuel Chapter 1 to 1 Kings Chapter 2 are among the most compelling accounts of the life of an individual in the Old Testament. David of Bethlehem in Judah was a shepherd boy who became a mighty warrior, a gifted poet and musician, an outlaw, a prophet, and the king of a united Israel. Get this from a library! A commentary on the First book of Samuel. [Loring W Batten] -- This commentary on the Old Testament book of First Samuel includes in-depth explanations and a critical introduction.


Share this book
You might also like
European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission, Report of Sessions 19th - June 19th 1996

European Inland Fisheries Advisory Commission, Report of Sessions 19th - June 19th 1996

Who cares about wildlife?

Who cares about wildlife?

Foreign Relations of the United States, 1964-1968, V. 16, Cyprus, Greece, and Turkey (044-000-02402-1)

Foreign Relations of the United States, 1964-1968, V. 16, Cyprus, Greece, and Turkey (044-000-02402-1)

The man of the house

The man of the house

In the name of God Almighty, amen

In the name of God Almighty, amen

Ready drafted credit control letters and forms

Ready drafted credit control letters and forms

conquest of England

conquest of England

Curiosity at the center of ones life

Curiosity at the center of ones life

Sir Thomas Lawrence, PRA, 1769-1830

Sir Thomas Lawrence, PRA, 1769-1830

BOOK ORDER 2003/4.

BOOK ORDER 2003/4.

Salary administration

Salary administration

Capitalism

Capitalism

How to run your car on coal or charcoal

How to run your car on coal or charcoal

Assessment in the primary school.

Assessment in the primary school.

A Commentary on the First Book of Samuel Download PDF EPUB FB2

The second book of Samuel describes the reign of David (around to BC). Purpose of Writing. The books of Samuel represent the transition from the time of the judges to the time of the kings. Samuel the central figure of the first book is at the same time the last judge and the first prophet (Acts ; Acts ).

In this first part of an ambitious two-volume commentary on the books of Samuel, David Toshio Tsumura sheds considerable light on the background of 1 Samuel, looking carefully at the Philistine and Canaanite cultures, as he untangles the difficult Hebrew by: A Commentary on the First Book of Samuel.

A Commentary on the First Book of Samuel ← Back to item details. PDF/ePub Info Share | 8 / Professor Ackroyd's introduction summarizes the place of the First Book of Samuel in the Old Testament canon, its relationship with history and its theological purpose.

The main divisions of the text are those provided by the New English Bible itself, but the text is further subdivided for the purposes of the commentary, which draws out the 5/5(1). In this first part of an ambitious two-volume commentary on the books of Samuel, David Toshio Tsumura sheds considerable light on the background of 1 Samuel, looking carefully at the Philistine and Canaanite cultures, as he untangles the difficult Hebrew text.

.Price: $ The Book of Samuel, or 1 Samuel and 2 Samuel, form part of the narrative history of Israel in the Nevi'im or "prophets" section of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, called the Deuteronomistic history, a series of books (Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings) that constitute a theological history of the Israelites and aim to explain God's law for Israel under the guidance of the prophets.

The first book of Samuel tells the story of Israel’s transition from a theocracy, or state ruled by a religious leader, to a monarchy, or state ruled by a political leader. Israel starts out as a nation of loosely affiliated tribes led by priests and religious heroes, but it becomes a nation-state led by a centralized king.

Clarke's Commentary. Preface to the First Book of Samuel, Otherwise Called The First Book of the Kings. This and the three following books were formerly termed the first, second, third, and fourth books of Kings, and the two books of Samuel made in ancient times but one; the separation which has taken place seems to have been done without.

David and Goliath, the call of Samuel, the witch of Endor, David and Bathsheba, such biblical stories are well known. But the books of 1 and 2 Samuel, where they are recorded, are among the most difficult books in the Bible. The Hebrew text is widely considered corrupt and sometimes even unintelligible.

The social and religious customs are strange and seem to diverge from the 5/5(1). FIRST SAMUEL First and Second Samuel were written as one book. They appear as such in the Hebrew manuscripts.

We owe the division of the one volume into two to the Septuagint. According to J. Sidlow Baxter in Explore the Book: “The present division into 1 and 2 Samuel has been decried by some scholars; yet undoubtedly it has much Size: 1MB.

The transactions of Heli, Samuel and Saul, and the persecutions which David sustained from the latter, form the subject of the first book, (Haydock) during the space of years. All the four books carry down the sacred history near years, from the year of the world till the transmigration of Juda, in the year Study 1 Samuel using Matthew Henry’s Bible Commentary (concise) to better understand Scripture with full outline and verse meaning.

The best intermediate-advanced level commentary on the first book of Samuel is now the commentary by David Tsumura in the NICOT series. It is very well written and very thorough. Tsumura's expertise in the languages of the ancient Near East is evident throughout.

He is currently working on the follow-up volume on 2 Samuel in the same series /5(7). THE FIRST BOOK OF SAMUEL, OTHERWISE CALLED, THE FIRST BOOK OF THE KINGS. ARGUMENT. IN this book is contained the history of the Israelites under the two last judges, Eli and Samuel, and under Saul, the first king in Israel; for their form of government was now changed, God, at the people’s desire, appointing Saul to be a king over them, instead of.

The contents of the Books of Samuel may be divided as follows: The Last Judges, Eli and Samuel (1 Sm –) Establishment of the Monarchy (1 Sm –) Saul and David (1 Sm –2 Sm ) The Reign of David (2 Sm –) Appendixes (2 Sm –) THE FIRST BOOK OF SAMUEL I.

THE LAST JUDGES, ELI AND SAMUEL. David and Goliath, the call of Samuel, the witch of Endor, David and Bathsheba—such biblical stories are well known. But the books of 1 and 2 Samuel, where they are recorded, are among the most difficult books in the Bible. The Hebrew text is widely considered corrupt and sometimes even unintelligible.

The social and religious customs are strange and seem to diverge from the. For a general account of both, see the preface to the first book of Samuel.

It is generally allowed that this book comprehends a period of forty years, from about A.M. to See the prefixed chronological account.

It has been divided into three parts: in the first we have an account of the happy commencement of David's reign, 2 Samuel Loring W. Batten’s A Commentary on the First Book of Samuel provides critical exegesis on the book of First Samuel that combines thorough exposition, semantic evaluation and pragmatics, and explanatory notes.

Batten covers the scope and composition of the text within historical context. In the Logos edition, A Commentary on the First Book of Samuel is enhanced by amazing.

This volume is the first of a planned two-volume set covering the Books of Samuel. Its part of the highly respected New International Commentary on /5.

COMMENTARY THE BOOK OF FIRST SAMUEL I. THE PREMONARCHICAL PERIOD IN ISRAEL: SAMUEL AND THE ARK NARRATIVES (—) A.

The Birth of Samuel (; )a BEHIND THE TEXT The initial unit of 1 Samuel opens with the narrative account of Samuel’s birth (), includes Hannah’s song of praise and. Free Bible commentary on the book of First Samuel. First Samuel Bible commentary. Questions and answers on the book of First Samuel.

The book on First Samuel. Study guide on the book of First Samuel, on line bible commentary for book of First Samuel, niv commentary First Samuel, free First Samuel bible commentary.THE FIRST BOOK OF SAMUEL OTHERWISE CALLED THE FIRST BOOK OF THE KINGS.

THE ARGUMENT. IT is not certainly known who was the penman of this Book, or whether it was written by one or more hands; nor is it or any great importance; for since there are sufficient evidences that God was the chief author of it, it matters not who was the instrument.

David and Goliath, the call of Samuel, the witch of Endor, David and Bathsheba — such biblical stories are well known. But the books of 1 and 2 Samuel, where they are recorded, are among the most difficult books in the Bible. The Hebrew text is widely considered corrupt and sometimes even unintelligible.

The social and religious customs are strange and seem to 5/5(1).